Tulicarpa

Tulicarpa

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      The Secret Society of Saint Tulicarpa, patron of silk charmers and cloth conjurers, has long been whispered about in ateliers of haute couture but little was known until recently when, in the deserted stone cell of a convent hidden away on the border of Portugal and Spain, an old trunk was opened and folds of exquisite silk were lifted out into the light after hundreds of years along with an illuminated prayer book: El Libro de Horas de Santa Tulicarpa

      Saint Tulicarpa was a Sister of the Order of the Illuminated Indumentaria in sixteenth century Spain, famous for their splendid habits. Her most renowned miracle was turning tile into silk.  Legend says she entered the convent when her betrothed sailed off to the New World to make his fortune and never returned.  In her sorrow she began to weave a trousseau for the afterlife, copying her designs into the margins of her prayer book.  Haughty condesas across the kingdom heard tell of her beautiful fabrics and many portraits of noblewomen draped in the finery of Saint Tulicarpa now hang in museums.  The illuminated prayer book was passed down like a holy relic through generations of Sisters, who each added their own designs, until the convent was abandoned and the book feared lost.

      Until now.

      Working in collaboration with the immensely talented artists Mariana Langley, Simoni Trapsioni and Cate Lyon, founder Lily Lewin is excited to offer limited edition shawls, capelets and scarves inspired by the mystic marginalia of Saint Tulicarpa. Each piece is unique and handmade in Savannah, Georgia.  We are also happy to create any custom garments with our fabric.

      Our motto is "Lux et Decus", which translates to light and ornament; our quest is to translate light and ornament into silk.

       

      “De estrellas te cubriera las espaldas, la luna te pusiera sobre el pecho, y mil luceros juntos en tus faldas.”

      ”I would cover your shoulders with stars, and put the moon on your breast and a thousand lights together on your skirts.”

      — Luis Barahona De Soto, Siglo XVI

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